Keeping it Fresh

produce mixWe have posted many instructions for keeping produce fresh over the years. How produce is handled (or not) when you get it greatly impacts shelf life. The idea is to keep living things living as long as possible – think freshly cut flowers. Here are a few tips and tricks to make the most of fresh produce by type first shared in 2007.
To keep your Farm Fresh To You produce at its best, follow these easy storage and handling instructions.

Artichokes
Keep artichokes refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag to retain moisture.

Arugula
Keep arugula refrigerated (32-36°F), stored in a perforated plastic bag, away from fruits to avoid deterioration.

Asparagus
Cut an inch off the bottom of asparagus spears. Submerge ends in water and refrigerate (32-36°F).

Beets
Keep beets refrigerated (32-36°F). The stems can be removed and they do not need to be in a plastic bag.

Bok Choy
Keep bok choy refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag. Wash and chop bok choy.

Broccoli, Broccolini, Broccoli Rabe
Keep broccoli refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag to retain moisture.

Cabbage & Brussel Sprouts
Store cabbage and brussel sprouts in the refrigerator (32-36°F), in a perforated plastic bag.

Carrots
Keep carrots refrigerated (32-36°F). Remove tops and store in a perforated plastic bag.

Cauliflower & Romanesco
Keep cauliflower refrigerated (32-36°F).

Celery
Keep celery refrigerated (32-36°F), stored in a perforated plastic bag.

Corn
Keep corn refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag.

Cucumbers
Keep cucumbers refrigerated (32-36°F).

Eggplant
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag.

Garlic
Store whole heads of garlic in a cool, dry, dark place (45-50°F) with good ventilation, but do not refrigerate. However, always refrigerate peeled or cut garlic in a sealed container.

Greens: Kale, Collard Greens, Chard, Mustard Greens
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag.

Green Beans
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), in a perforated plastic bag..
Green Onions
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F) in a sealed plastic bag.
Leeks
Keep leeks refrigerated (32-36°F). Trim white part, discard greens unless your recipe calls for them.
Lettuce
Keep lettuce refrigerated (32-36°F), stored in a perforated plastic bag, away from fruits to avoid deterioration..
Onions
Store whole onions in a cool, dry, dark place (55-65°F) with good ventilation, away from potatoes (which absorb the onions’ moisture). Always refrigerate cut onions.

Peppers
Store whole peppers in a cool, dry place (45-50°F), away from fruits to avoid over-ripening. Always refrigerate cut peppers.
Potatoes
Store whole potatoes in a cool, dry, dark place (45-50°F) with good ventilation, but do not refrigerate.
Radishes
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag to retain moisture. Wash carefully.
Snap Peas
Keep snap peas refrigerated (32-36°F), in a perforated plastic bag.
Spinach
Keep spinach refrigerated (32-36°F), stored in a perforated plastic bag, away from fruits to avoid deterioration. Wash spinach and remove stems.
Summer Squash
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag.
Sweet Potatoes
Store whole sweet potatoes in a cool, dry, dark place (45-50°F) with good ventilation, but do not refrigerate.

Tomatoes
Keep tomatoes at room temperature (55-70°F). Do not refrigerate, as it will make the tomatoes mealy and flavorless.
Turnips & Rutabaga
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag to retain moisture.
Winter Squash
Store winter squash in a cool, dry place (45-50°F).
Fresh Fruits

Apples
Keep apples refrigerated (32-36°F), storing them away from vegetables, as apples produce ethylene, a ripening agent.
Avocadoes
Ripen avocadoes in a paper bag on your countertop; when fully ripe, store whole avocadoes in a cool, dry place (45-50°F).

Bananas
Store at room temperature (55-70°F).
Grapes
Keep grapes refrigerated (32-36°F), in a perforated plastic bag. Do not wash until ready to use..

Kiwis
Keep kiwis refrigerated (32-36°F), away from other fruit to prevent over-ripening.!
Lemons & Limes
Store in a cool, dry place (45-50°F), away from other fruits to avoid absorption of off-flavors. Wash before using.

Mangoes
Keep mangoes refrigerated (32-36°F).

Melons
Store whole melons in a cool, dry place (45-50°F), away from other fruits. Always store cut melons in the refrigerator.

Oranges, Grapefruit & Mandarins
Store in a cool, dry place (45-50°F). Always refrigerate cut citrus. Oranges, grapefruit & mandarins are a seasonal pleasure.

Pears
Store whole pears in the refrigerator (32-36°F).
Rhubarb
Keep refrigerated (32-36°F), storing in a perforated plastic bag.
Stone Fruit: Nectarines, Apricots, Peaches, Plums, Pluots, Apriums
Store whole stone fruit in the refrigerator (32-36°F).

Strawberries & Bush Berries
Fresh berries are highly perishable. Store them in the coldest part of the refrigerator (32-36°F), loosely covered with plastic wrap. Do not wash until ready to use.
Others

Herbs
Remove band or tie; wash and dry. Snip off the ends and submerge them in a glass of water. Cover with a plastic bag and leave in the refrigerator.

Mushrooms
Store mushrooms in a paper bag in the refrigerator (32-36°F).

A Trick to Revive Your Wilted Greens or Lettuce

Wilted greens and lettuce are often just dried out which can still occur even if the greens remain in constant refrigeration.

Cold Water Overnight
Submerge the wilted greens in cold water by placing them in a dish, filling it with water, and putting it in the refrigerator overnight.

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About Rachel

Owner @ Brown Box Organics.
This entry was posted in Apple, Asparagus, Avocado, Banana, Basil, Beans, Beets, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrot, Cauliflower, Celery, Citrus, Corn, Cranberries, Cucumber, Greens, Leek, Lemons, Lettuce, Mushrooms, Onion, Orange, Pear, Peppers, Pomegranate, Potato, Pumpkin, Radish, Rhubarb, Spinach, Summer Squash, Tomato, Winter Squash, Yam & Sweet Potato, Zucchini & Summer Squash and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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